Tag Archives: fscd

A long time between…

I think the timeline between posts on this blog are so distant because Ben is doing so well.  I’m afraid to say it out loud as it tends to jinx his progress.

Two weeks ago, Francois and I (somewhat simultaneously) decided that it was time that Ben have his own room again.  He hasn’t had his own space since he was an infant as from birth until the moment we got overnight funding, he slept in our room.   And often on my chest or in my arms on the couch.  Now that we have two lovely nurses that accommodate his sleeping pattern (also known as “without a sleeping pattern”) – it’s time to give him that space back.

Practically overnight, we cleared out our extra room that we had been using for storage, swapped beds with Avery so we could use her day bed in his room, purchased furniture, decorations and voila! After placing his personalized “B” from his Ma Tante Chantal outside his room door, Ben had a bedroom.  He had.. HAS a space of his own.

Overwhelming but exciting!  Best part – he laughs when we take him down there now; like he knows it’s his.  I could cry just thinking about it.  Such a milestone moment for our family!

Ben's New Room 10440978_10154188519885697_5477989707695855068_n

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Concerns regarding FSCD funding process – a letter to MLA’s in the disability sector

Good morning!

I am writing you this morning as I am extremely frustrated by the approval and decision making process regarding services requested for my son.  We, as a family, absolutely do not ask for anything more than we need or our son requires and ensure that we do not abuse the system put in place to support children like ours but we have come to a standstill with our contract with Family Supports for Disabilities.

Our son Benjamin has a rare neurological disorder called Ponto Cerebellar Hypoplasia Type 3; I’ll spare you the details as I’m sure you will just Google it if you’re interested but what it has meant for us and more importantly him, are countless nights of not sleeping.  I’m not exaggerating when I state that our child does not ever sleep in a pattern or that he is up for hours at time each night.  In addition to that, he is supplemented food through a gastrointestinal tube which puts him at risk for aspiration and choking due to reflux and sensory issues.  For the past five years, my husband and I have tagged off and on to support Ben at night, taking turns sleeping the couch, watching Elmo with him for hours at a time or simply just playing with him but it’s come to a point where we are feeling burnt out.  I feel we have made a good run at trying to do it ourselves.  But the worst part of our exhaustion is how it relays to Ben; he definitely can feel the frustration when he’s been up  since one in the morning and we’re tired.  We try our best to be patient and accommodate him but for lack of better word – we’re pooped.  This is not a normal circumstance. We want to be the best parents for him, provide him the best quality of life and to ensure that he’s happy and to do that, we’ve applied for over night respite assistance and have even registered and qualified for the service from Nurse Next Door (a private company) to watch Ben through the week 10p.m. – 6 a.m.

However – FSCD will not approve the funding needed which I do not understand.  How is my child not considered as valuable as they funding requested?

I understand that FSCD may look into using the Supports Intensity Scale for future assessments and when that happens, Ben will without a doubt receive the financial supports he requires based on his medical and behavioral assessment alone but until then, I don’t believe that asking for overnight respite for him is much to ask; it will allow us to be our best for him during the day when we can engage him in his community, include him in social activities and allow him to have fuller days.  How is that not worth what we’re asking for?
Please point me in the right direction…. a direction that allows us to provide nothing less than the best support possible for our son.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

Regards,

Kristi Hall-Busque